Services

Coronary Angiography

Coronary angiography is a procedure that uses a special dye (contrast material) and x-rays to see how blood flows through the arteries in your heart.

Intravascular Ultrasound

Intravascular ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to see inside blood vessels. It is useful for evaluating the coronary arteries that supply the heart.

Coronary Angioplasty

If you have coronary artery disease, the arteries in your heart are narrowed or blocked by a sticky material called plaque. Angioplasty is a procedure to restore blood flow through the artery. The doctor threads a thin tube through a blood vessel in the arm or groin up to the involved site in the artery. The tube has a tiny balloon on the end. When the tube is in place, the doctor inflates the balloon to push the plaque outward against the wall of the artery. This widens the artery and restores blood flow. Doctors may use angioplasty to reduce chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart or minimize damage to heart muscle from a heart attack. Many people go home the day after angioplasty, and are able to return to work within 2-3 days of the procedure.

Coronary Stenting

Coronary stenting is used to restore normal blood flow to the heart through the use of a thin tube that is threaded through a blood vessel to the site of the blockage. In coronary stenting a stent is attached to the balloon. The balloon and stent widens the artery and restores blood flow. Once the balloon is deflated the stent stays in place to help hold the vessel open. There are different kinds of stents. Most are made of a metal or plastic mesh-like material. It is placed inside a coronary artery after balloon angioplasty to prevent the artery from re-closing. A drug-eluting stent is coated with a medicine that helps further prevent the arteries from re-closing. Like other coronary artery stents, it is left permanently in the artery.

Peripheral Angiography

If you have peripheral artery disease, the arteries in your extremities are narrowed or blocked by a sticky material called plaque. Angioplasty is a procedure to restore blood flow through the artery. The doctor threads a thin tube through a blood vessel in the arm or groin up to the involved site in the artery. The tube has a tiny balloon on the end. When the tube is in place, the doctor inflates the balloon to push the plaque outward against the wall of the artery. This widens the artery and restores blood flow. Doctors may use angioplasty to restore blood flow to various organs and extremities. Many people go home the day of angioplasty, and are able to return to work within a week of coming home.

Peripheral Stenting

Peripheral stenting is similar to that of angioplasty except a stent is placed in the artery via the use of a small plastic tube and balloon. Stenting often gives longer term patency of a vessel. Your physician will determine whether angioplasty of stenting is the best choice for you.

Laser Atherectomy

If you have peripheral artery disease (PAD) in your legs, peripheral laser atherectomy is just one procedure your physician might recommend. Peripheral laser atherectomy uses a catheter that emits high energy light (laser) to unblock the artery. The catheter is maneuvered through the vessel until it reaches the blockage. Laser energy is used to essentially vaporize the blockage inside the vessel. The result is increased blood flow to the peripheral tissue.

Pacemaker Implantation

Newer pacemakers weigh as little as 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts:

  1. The generator contains the battery and the information to control the heartbeat.
  2. The leads are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart.

A pacemaker must be implanted under the skin. This procedure takes about 1 hour in most cases. You will be given a sedative to help you relax. You will be awake during the procedure.

A small incision (cut) is made, most often on the left side of the chest below your collarbone.

The pacemaker generator is then placed under the skin at this location. The generator may also be placed in the abdomen, but this is less common.

Using live x-rays to see the area, the doctor puts the leads through the cut, into a vein, and then into the heart. The leads are connected to the generator. The skin is closed with stitches. Most people go home within 1 day of the procedure.

Angioplasty

If you have coronary artery disease, the arteries in your heart are narrowed or blocked by a sticky material called plaque. Angioplasty is a procedure to restore blood flow through the artery. The doctor threads a thin tube through a blood vessel in the arm or groin up to the involved site in the artery. The tube has a tiny balloon on the end. When the tube is in place, the doctor inflates the balloon to push the plaque outward against the wall of the artery. This widens the artery and restores blood flow. Doctors may use angioplasty to reduce chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart or minimize damage to heart muscle from a heart attack. Many people go home the day after angioplasty, and are able to return to work within a week of coming home.

Central Venous Occlusion (May Thurner’s Syndrome)

Is a Condition in which the left iliofemoral vein is compressed by the overlying common iliac artery leading to pooling or stasis of the blood. This can result in formation of blood clots, pain when the limb is hanging over the edge of a bed or chair and/or significant swelling of the leg itself.

Conditions Treated

Angina

Angina is chest pain or discomfort you feel when there is not enough blood flow to your heart muscle. Your heart muscle needs the oxygen that the blood carries. Angina may feel like pressure or a squeezing pain in your chest. It may feel like indigestion. You may also feel pain in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back.

Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common heart disease. CAD happens when a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, reducing blood flow.

There are three types of angina:

  • Stable angina is the most common type. It happens when the heart is working harder than usual. Stable angina has a regular pattern. Rest and medicines usually help.
  • Unstable angina is the most dangerous. It does not follow a pattern and can happen without physical exertion. It does not go away with rest or medicine. It is a sign that you could have a heart attack soon.
  • Variant angina is rare. It happens when you are resting. Medicines can help.

Not all chest pain or discomfort is angina. If you have chest pain, you should see your health care provider.

Arrhythmias

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. When the heart beats too slowly, it is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat.

Many factors can affect your heart’s rhythm, such as having had a heart attack, smoking, congenital heart defects, and stress. Some substances or medicines may also cause arrhythmias.

Symptoms of arrhythmias include:

  • Fast or slow heart beat
  • Skipping beats
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sweating

Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have an arrhythmia. Treatment to restore a normal heart rhythm may include medicines, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker, or sometimes surgery.

Atrial Fibrillation

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. The cause is a disorder in the heart’s electrical system.

Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. But you may feel:

  • Palpitations — an abnormal rapid heartbeat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weakness or difficulty exercising
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Fatigue
  • Confusion

AF can lead to an increased risk of stroke. In many patients, it can also cause chest pain, heart attack, or heart failure.

Doctors diagnose AF using family and medical history, a physical exam, and a test called an electrocardiogram (EKG), which looks at the electrical waves your heart makes. Treatments include medicines and procedures to restore normal rhythm.

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue.

Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don’t even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including:

  • Heart failure
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Heart valve problems
  • Sudden cardiac arrest

Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes.

Carotid Artery Disease

Carotid artery disease is a form of disease that affects the vessels leading to the head and brain (cerebrovascular disease). Like the heart, the brain’s cells need a constant supply of oxygen-rich blood. This blood supply is delivered to the brain by the 2 large carotid arteries in the front of your neck and by 2 smaller vertebral arteries at the back of your neck. The right and left vertebral arteries come together at the base of the brain to form what is called the basilar artery. A stroke most often occurs when the carotid arteries become blocked and the brain does not get enough oxygen. Treatment may include medications, surgery or stenting.

Claudication

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque builds up on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs. Plaque is a substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This can reduce or stop blood flow, usually to the legs. If severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg.

The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Many people who have PAD don’t have any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include:

  • Pain, numbness, achiness, or heaviness in the leg muscles. This happens when walking or climbing stairs.
  • Weak or absent pulses in the legs or feet
  • Sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs that heal slowly, poorly, or not at all
  • A pale or bluish color to the skin
  • A lower temperature in one leg than the other leg
  • Poor nail growth on the toes and decreased hair growth on the legs
  • Erectile dysfunction, especially among men who have diabetes

PAD can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack.

Doctors diagnose PAD with a physical exam and heart and imaging tests. Treatments include lifestyle changes, medicines, and sometimes surgery. Lifestyle changes include dietary changes, exercise, and efforts to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women.

CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can’t get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts’ blood supply, causing permanent heart damage.

Critical Limb Ischemia

Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) is a severe obstruction of the arteries which markedly reduces blood flow to the extremities (hands, feet and legs) and has progressed to the point of severe pain and even skin ulcers, sores, or gangrene. The pain caused by CLI can wake up an individual at night. This pain, also called “rest pain,” is often in the leg and can be relieved temporarily by hanging the leg over the bed or getting up to walk.

CLI is a very severe condition of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and needs immediate comprehensive treatment by a vascular surgeon or vascular specialist. This condition will not improve on its own.

Heart Block

Heart block is a problem in the electrical signals in the heart.

Normally, the heart beat starts in an area in the top chambers of the heart (atria). This area is the heart’s pacemaker. The electrical signals travel to the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles). This keeps the heart beat steady and regular.

Heart block occurs when the electrical signal is slowed down or does not reach the bottom chambers of the heart. Your heart may beat slowly, or it may skip beats. Heart block may resolve on its own, or it may be permanent and require treatment.

Heart Failure

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can’t pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should. It can affect one or both sides of the heart.

The weakening of the heart’s pumping ability causes

  • Blood and fluid to back up into the lungs
  • The buildup of fluid in the feet, ankles and legs – called edema
  • Tiredness and shortness of breath

Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have had a heart attack. Men have a higher rate of heart failure than women.

Your doctor will diagnose heart failure by doing a physical exam and heart tests. Treatment includes treating the underlying cause of your heart failure, medicines, and heart transplantation if other treatments fail.

Renovascular Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure.

Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of

  • 119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure
  • 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure
  • Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.

In patients with renovascular hypertension, narrowing of the arteries supplying blood flow to the kidney makes management of hypertension difficult. With stenting or angioplasty of the renal artery blood pressure, control can often be easier to achieve.

Irregular Heartbeat

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. When the heart beats too slowly, it is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat.

Many factors can affect your heart’s rhythm, such as having had a heart attack, smoking, congenital heart defects, and stress. Some substances or medicines may also cause arrhythmias. Treatment can include medications, cardioversion, electrical physiologic studies, pacemaker or defibrillator placement.

Mesenteric Ischemia

Acute mesenteric ischemia is sudden blockage of blood flow to part of the intestines, which may lead to gangrene and perforation (puncture).

Severe abdominal pain develops suddenly.

  • Angiography may be performed.
  • Immediate surgery is needed.

Acute mesenteric ischemia has multiple causes. The most common are:

  • Arterial embolism
  • Arterial thrombus

Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition of the blood vessels that supply the legs and feet. It leads to narrowing and hardening of the arteries. This causes decreased blood flow, which can injure nerves and other tissues.

Upper Extremity Vascular Disease

Vascular disorders are problems with arteries and veins. Arteries are pipes that bring oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the fingers. Veins are pipes that return the used blood back to the heart and lungs. At the wrist, the radial and ulnar arteries bring blood into the hand. These arteries connect into two arches that branch out to supply blood to each of the fingers (Figure 1).

These disorders are less common in the upper extremities (arms) than in the lower extremities (legs), but they still affect about 10% of people. They can cause problems such as pain, open wounds, or even loss of body parts.

What to Expect & Information

On the scheduled day of your procedure, please report to:

3200 Quail Springs Parkway Suite 100
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73134

Download Instructions Here

Leading Up to Your Procedure:

Plan to have a family member or friend drive you to the Facility and take you home afterwards. Due to our facility size, we will not be able to allow more than 2 visitors to accompany you in your private room. If you have additional visitors they will have to wait in our waiting room. These person(s) are welcome to stay or we will call them when you are ready to go home.

You should inform your doctor if there is a possibility you may be pregnant prior to the day of your procedure.

  • If you take medications, follow your physician’s instructions on what to take prior to your procedure.
  • Smokers should not smoke for 24 to 48 hours before the procedure, to enhance your breathing during your procedure.
  • Please complete the Anesthesia Preoperative Questionnaire form in this packet and bring that form with you on the day of your procedure.

Medication Information:

If you take ANY of the following medications, please follow the directions for that specific medication.

  • PRADAXA, ELIQUIS, XARELTO – DO NOT TAKE FOR 3 DAYS PRIOR TO YOUR PROCEDURE
  • COUMADIN, WARFARIN – DO NOT TAKE FOR 4 DAYS PRIOR TO YOUR PROCEDURE
  • CONTINUE TO TAKE PLAVIX, EFFIENT, BRILINTA AS USUAL
  • TAKE your blood pressure and heart related medications AS USUAL with a sip of water.
  • DO NOT TAKE oral diabetic medications 48 HOURS PRIOR TO PROCEDURE
  • Take ONLY ½ of your USUAL MORNING dose of insulin.

The Night Before Your Procedure:

  • Do Not Eat Or Drink Anything After Midnight on the night before your procedure, or as ordered by your physician.
  • This helps reduce the chance of an upset stomach during your procedure. If you have to take medicine before your procedure, you may take small sips of water to swallow your medication.
  • Remove nail polish /shellac/ gel/ acrylic nails

The Morning of Your Procedure:

  • Bathe or shower, to reduce the chance of infection.
  • You may brush your teeth the morning of your procedure.
  • Please arrive to the Facility at your scheduled time. If you are delayed or need to cancel your procedure please call the Facility at 405-701-9899
  • Wear comfortable, loose fitting clothing that is easy to take off and put on.
  • Leave your valuables at home. We do not have a safe to store your valuables. If you have a family member coming with you- they will be asked to keep your things.
  • If you wear glasses, contacts or hearing aids, bring along a case to store them in while you are having your procedure.
  • If you have a cold, a fever of 100 degrees F or higher, a skin rash or an infection of any kind, notify your physician before coming in for your procedure.

Bring a list of all medicines you are taking. Be sure to include the exact name and dosage of these drugs. Bring the Anesthesia Preoperative Questionnaire with you as well.

When you arrive to the Facility:

  • Enter the double doors in the center of the building on the WEST SIDE of the building. Advanced CardioVascular Solutions is on the first floor just past the elevators in Suite 100. CV Health Clinic is on floor 2 in Suite 200. The doors on the north side of the building under the awning ARE NOT an entrance.
  • If you need wheelchair assistance, please call prior to arrival to let us know and we will arrange to meet you at your vehicle with a wheelchair.
  • Our Admissions Coordinator will walk you through admission paperwork we will need and then show you back to your private patient bay as soon as possible.
  • Your visitors may wait in your private room with you for the duration of your stay. Please keep in mind the temperature tends to be cool, so visitors may want to dress in layers or bring a blanket with them.
  • We will give you the opportunity to use the restroom prior to your procedure. Empty your bladder as much as possible before your procedure starts.

Your nurses and staff will begin getting you ready for your procedure.

There will be several monitors connected to you briefly before your procedure.

An IV (intravenous) line will be placed into a blood vessel in your arm. This allows the nursing staff and physicians to give you medications as needed throughout your stay.

A staff member will clean and shave the area where the catheter will be inserted. This makes it easier for your physician to do your procedure. It also reduces the risk of infection.

Your physician will be by to discuss your procedure with you and answer any questions you may have.

Once your nurses and staff have finished preparing you for your procedure–you will be taken back as soon as your procedural room staff are ready. Depending on several different factors this wait time will vary, but we promise to do our best to make you comfortable in the event of any delays in starting your procedure.

During your procedure:

Our staff will do our very best to make you comfortable throughout your procedure. We will talk to you and explain everything we are doing as we are doing it. If you feel uncomfortable or have any questions, please tell your staff so that they can better help to make this experience as pleasant as possible for you.

After Your Procedure/Surgery:

  • After you leave the procedure room, you will be taken back to your private patient bay until we are able to safely allow you to leave the Facility.
  • We will monitor you closely as you recover from your procedure. If you have a sheath from your procedure you will be required to lie flat until that sheath is removed and your physician feels that you can safely change positions. During this time we will do our best to keep you relaxed and provide you with some form of entertainment.
  • Once your sedation has cleared, we will progressively allow you to drink and eat. Patients and 1 visitor will be provided with a boxed deli lunch. If more than 1 visitor accompanies you there are many local restaurants and food choices nearby.
  • For your own safety, a responsible adult MUST drive you home.
  • Someone responsible should stay with you for the first 24 hours after the procedure.
  • The day after your procedure you will receive a telephone call from one of our staff to inquire as to how you are feeling. If you have any questions or concerns, this will be a great opportunity to voice them.
  • Times vary based on each patient, but you can plan that you will be with us for approximately two to six (2-6) hours.
  • If you have any questions, please ask your nurses and staff at any time throughout your stay at our Facility!

If you have any questions, please call: 405-701-9899